IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1020: The Body and the Text: Medical Humanities and Medieval Literature, c. 1150-1550, I

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO) / Medical Humanities Research Centre (MHRC), Swansea University
Organisers:Laura Kalas Williams, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Alison Williams, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Moderator/Chair:Wendy J. Turner, Department of History, Anthropology & Philosophy, Augusta University, Georgia
Paper 1020-aHealth Narratives: Rabelais and the Pox
(Language: English)
Alison Williams, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Alison Williams, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Alison Williams, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Index terms: Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Medicine
Paper 1020-b‘Ye die for dole’: Mental Health and Social Reform in Piers Plowman
(Language: English)
Martin Laidlaw, Faculty of English, University of Dundee
Martin Laidlaw, Faculty of English, University of Dundee
Martin Laidlaw, Faculty of English, University of Dundee
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Medicine
Paper 1020-cBeyond Magic: Maladies and Remedies in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Vita Merlini
(Language: English)
Karen A. Winstead, Department of English, Ohio State University
Karen A. Winstead, Department of English, Ohio State University
Karen A. Winstead, Department of English, Ohio State University
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Medicine
Abstract

This panel is one in a series of sessions which seeks to investigate how medicine, health, and wellbeing are represented in medieval literature, and how literary texts from this period contribute to training and practice in the Medical Humanities. This panel focuses on issues of mental health, psychological pain, melancholic suffering, and ‘unseen’ medical conditions, as they play out in medieval texts. Using later medieval literary texts, as well as Old Norse-Icelandic poetry, the session interrogates concepts such as the emotions, the affectivity of pain, and the healer, and asks how current notions of disability and social responsibility interact.