IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1025: Animals and Materiality in the Arthurian Tradition

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Centre for Arthurian Studies, Bangor University
Organiser:Renée Michelle Ward, School of English & Journalism, University of Lincoln
Moderator/Chair:Renée Michelle Ward, School of English & Journalism, University of Lincoln
Paper 1025-aAnimal Similes and the Classical Tradition in Layamon's Brut
(Language: English)
Jacqueline Burek, Department of English, George Mason University, Virginia
Jacqueline Burek, Department of English, George Mason University, Virginia
Jacqueline Burek, Department of English, George Mason University, Virginia
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Paper 1025-bArthurian Animals in Sacred Spaces: Why the Arthurian Beast Went to Church
(Language: English)
Matt Clancy, Department of English & Humanities, Birkbeck, University of London
Matt Clancy, Department of English & Humanities, Birkbeck, University of London
Matt Clancy, Department of English & Humanities, Birkbeck, University of London
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Art History - Decorative Arts, Language and Literature - Middle English
Paper 1025-cWhen a Ten-Point Stag with Metamorphic Horns is Just a Ten-Point Stag with Metamorphic Horns: Alienating People in Book VII of Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae
(Language: English)
David G. Pedersen, Department of English, College of the Ozarks, Missouri
David G. Pedersen, Department of English, College of the Ozarks, Missouri
David G. Pedersen, Department of English, College of the Ozarks, Missouri
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Latin
Abstract

This session explores animals and materiality within Arthurian traditions, with a particular emphasis on how animals and their bodies figure as objects of veneration and/or consumption within the legend, or how, as objects themselves, they contribute to the legend’s production, preservation and perpetuation. Do animals within Arthuriana have agency beyond their symbolic functions? How might animals be considered a part of the material landscape of the legend both within and outside of the textual narratives? How, where, when, and to what purpose or function are animals found in material Arthurian spaces, and in what ways have animals carried the Arthurian legend across space and time from the medieval period to the present?