IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1033: Networks and Materiality in the Angevin World, I

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Battle Conference on Anglo-Norman Studies
Organiser:Stephen Church, School of History, University of East Anglia
Moderator/Chair:Alheydis Plassmann, Institut für Geschichtswissenschaft, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn
Paper 1033-aAbsolutely Minted!: Coinage, Power, and Lordly Authority in Early 13th-Century Angoulême
(Language: English)
Sally Spong, School of History, University of East Anglia
Sally Spong, School of History, University of East Anglia
Sally Spong, School of History, University of East Anglia
Index terms: Gender Studies, Numismatics, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1033-bCommunication with Closed Letters: A Mirror for the King's Personal Reactions?
(Language: English)
Christina Bröker, Lehrstuhl für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Universität Regensburg
Christina Bröker, Lehrstuhl für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Universität Regensburg
Christina Bröker, Lehrstuhl für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Universität Regensburg
Index terms: Administration, Archives and Sources, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Paper 1033-cLong Live the King?: Using the Coinage of the Empress Matilda to Shed Light on the Events of 1141
(Language: English)
Johanne Porter, Consortium for the Humanities & Arts South-East England, University of East Anglia
Johanne Porter, Consortium for the Humanities & Arts South-East England, University of East Anglia
Johanne Porter, Consortium for the Humanities & Arts South-East England, University of East Anglia
Index terms: Gender Studies, Numismatics, Politics and Diplomacy, Women's Studies
Abstract

The session concentrates on the ways in which material objects can be used to shed light on 12th and 13th-century politics. The session examines the use of coins (those of Isabella of Angoulême and the Empress Matilda) to demonstrate female lordship in action. The session also examines the use of the physical appearance of Chancery records from the reigns of John and Henry III to examine the question of affective emotion.