IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1037: Materialities of Lordship in the Later Middle Ages, I: Qualitative Approaches

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:ERC Project 'Lordship & the Rise of States in Western Europe, 1300-1600', Universiteit Gent
Organiser:Erika Graham-Goering, Vakgroep Geschiedenis, Universiteit Gent
Moderator/Chair:Jim van der Meulen, Vakgroep Geschiedenis, Universiteit Gent
Paper 1037-aWho's in Charge?: Re-Evaluating the Concept of Lordship in Late Medieval Normandy
(Language: English)
Ysaline Bourgine de Meder, School of History, University of St Andrews
Ysaline Bourgine de Meder, School of History, University of St Andrews
Ysaline Bourgine de Meder, School of History, University of St Andrews
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Political Thought
Paper 1037-bSeigneurial Self-Representation of Some Prominent Families in Languedoc
(Language: English)
Gert-Jan Van de Voorde, School of History, University of St Andrews / Vakgroep Geschiedenis, Universiteit Gent
Gert-Jan Van de Voorde, School of History, University of St Andrews / Vakgroep Geschiedenis, Universiteit Gent
Gert-Jan Van de Voorde, School of History, University of St Andrews / Vakgroep Geschiedenis, Universiteit Gent
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Paper 1037-cLandscapes of Lordship: Between Military Needs and Environmentalism
(Language: English)
Sander Govaerts, Capaciteitsgroep Geschiedenis, Universiteit van Amsterdam
Sander Govaerts, Capaciteitsgroep Geschiedenis, Universiteit van Amsterdam
Sander Govaerts, Capaciteitsgroep Geschiedenis, Universiteit van Amsterdam
Index terms: Military History, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

This session aims to chart the self-representation of late medieval lords and what they considered important as qualities of their lordship. What choices did lords and seigneurial officers make to assert the status of their lordships to the king and to their contemporaries? How were these reflected in the diplomatic and aesthetic qualities of the administrative documents produced by lords and kings, and in the physical environment in which they exercised their power? Such descriptive and demonstrative processes help us to understand how both the salient material features of lordship and their encapsulation in written records expressed seigneurial power and status.