IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1041: Text as Material Artefacts: Archaeology of 'Materiality' as a Research Concept, 15th-21st Century, I

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 09.00-10.30

Organiser:Katharina Kaska, Sammlung von Handschriften und alten Drucken, Österreichische Nationalbibliothek, Wien
Moderator/Chair:Dominique Stutzmann, Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes (IRHT), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Paper 1041-aLearned Alphabets: Visualisations and Representations of Script and Writing as a Paradigm of Erudition from the 15th to the 21st Centuries
(Language: English)
Andreas Zajic, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Andreas Zajic, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Epigraphy, Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1041-bThe Maurists and the Beginnings of Palaeography: Some Specimina of Ancient Handwritings
(Language: English)
Jérémy Delmulle, Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes (IRHT), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Jérémy Delmulle, Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes (IRHT), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Historiography - Medieval, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1041-cBeauty and the Beast: Charters under the Eyes of Scholars, 18th-21st Century
(Language: English)
Sébastien Barret, Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes (IRHT), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Sébastien Barret, Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes (IRHT), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

Texts are at the same time an idea and a form. The latter is the result of a combination of inherited social uses and specific intentions by the various actors involved in transmitting the text as idea. All textual artefacts are concerned: manuscripts, charters, inscriptions, tapestries, seals, coins, etc. The present session explores the pre-historical time of ‘materiality’ as a research concept and how historians, palaeographers and diplomatists have taken the dual nature of the text into account in the past. A. Zajic gives an overview of diverging strategies of describing scripts in the everyday working and publishing practice of penmen, scribes and scholars, drawing on examples from epigraphic, diplomatic, manuscript and print contexts from the 15th Centuries until our own days. J. Delmulle studies the Maurist’s large collection of manuscript facsimiles of ancient handwritings which shows what awareness has emerged from the publication of Mabillon’s De re diplomatica. S. Barret addresses how the judgments expressed by scholars since the 18th century shaped the scholarly perception of medieval documents and documentary practices, and, to a certain extent, still do.