IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1048: Forging Memory: False Documents and Historical Consciousness in the Middle Ages, I

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Exeter
Organiser:Levi Roach, Department of History, University of Exeter
Moderator/Chair:Edward Roberts, School of History, University of Kent
Paper 1048-aCharters, Forgeries, and the Diplomatic of Salvation in Medieval Iberia
(Language: English)
Graham Barrett, School of History & Heritage, University of Lincoln
Graham Barrett, School of History & Heritage, University of Lincoln
Graham Barrett, School of History & Heritage, University of Lincoln
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Charters and Diplomatics, Literacy and Orality
Paper 1048-bUsing and Detecting Forged Charters in Northern Iberia, c. 900-1100
(Language: English)
Daria Safronova, Department of Medieval History Lomonosov Moscow State University
Daria Safronova, Department of Medieval History Lomonosov Moscow State University
Daria Safronova, Department of Medieval History Lomonosov Moscow State University
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Charters and Diplomatics, Literacy and Orality
Paper 1048-cTrue Lies: Leo of Vercelli, Arduin of Ivrea, and the Struggle for Piedmont
(Language: English)
Levi Roach, Department of History, University of Exeter
Levi Roach, Department of History, University of Exeter
Levi Roach, Department of History, University of Exeter
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Charters and Diplomatics, Local History
Abstract

Over the last two decades, scholars have shown great interest in how group and institutional identities were constructed and contested within (and beyond) the Middle Ages. Much attention has been given to the role of narrative histories of peoples, regions, and religious houses in this context. Only relatively recently, however, has the contribution of more ‘documentary’ sources come to be appreciated. In recent years, we have learned that cartularies and cartulary-chronicles are not merely repositories of texts, but powerful statements about local and institutional identity. These sessions seek to develop these lines of investigation further by examining the contribution of forgery to these processes. They aim to bridge the gap between the study of historical memory (which until recently has taken written narratives as its starting point) and documentary forgery (which tends to focus on the legal implications of such texts), offering new vantage points on old problems regarding uses of the past in the Middle Ages.