IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1049: Digging Up St Olav?: Excavating St Clement's Church in Trondheim

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 09.00-10.30

Organiser:Stefka G. Eriksen, Norsk institutt for kulturminneforskning, Oslo
Moderator/Chair:Sigrun Høgetveit Berg, Institutt for historie og religionsvitenskap, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitetet
Paper 1049-aWhy Build a Church on This Spot?: A Presentation of St Clement's Church in Early Urban Trondheim Based on Archaeological Evidence
(Language: English)
Anna Petersén, Norsk institutt for kulturminneforskning, Oslo
Anna Petersén, Norsk institutt for kulturminneforskning, Oslo
Anna Petersén, Norsk institutt for kulturminneforskning, Oslo
Index terms: Archaeology - Sites, Architecture - Religious, Geography and Settlement Studies, Local History
Paper 1049-bSt Clement's Church in Old Norse Literature
(Language: English)
Stefka G. Eriksen, Norsk institutt for kulturminneforskning, Oslo
Stefka G. Eriksen, Norsk institutt for kulturminneforskning, Oslo
Stefka G. Eriksen, Norsk institutt for kulturminneforskning, Oslo
Index terms: Archaeology - Sites, Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Local History, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1049-cThe First Churches in Die-Hard Pagan Trøndelag
(Language: English)
John McNicol, Department of Archaeology, Conservation & History, UiT the Artic University of Norway
John McNicol, Department of Archaeology, Conservation & History, UiT the Artic University of Norway
John McNicol, Department of Archaeology, Conservation & History, UiT the Artic University of Norway
Index terms: Archaeology - Sites, Geography and Settlement Studies, Historiography - Medieval, Historiography - Modern Scholarship
Abstract

A recent archaeological excavation in Trondheim, Norway (2016-17) uncovered what is believed to be St Clement’s church. The wooden church was possibly built by king Olav Haraldsson and was maybe the site where his cult was initiated one year after his death, as mentioned in the sagas. In this session we will: (1) present the main results from the excavation; (2) discuss the representation of St. Clements’ church in literary sources, and (3) contextualize the material within the history of the Christianization of Norway. A main concern is thus to engage in the friction between new archeological data and the historical records.