IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1053: Gender, Identity, and the Medieval Bishop/Secular Clergy, I

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:EPISCOPUS: Society for the Study of Bishops and Secular Clergy in the Middle Ages
Organiser:Evan Gatti, Department of Art & Art History, Elon University, North Carolina
Moderator/Chair:Evan Gatti, Department of Art & Art History, Elon University, North Carolina
Paper 1053-aImperial Women and the Construction of Sacred Spaces in Late Antiquity
(Language: English)
Aneilya Barnes, Department of History, Coastal Carolina University
Aneilya Barnes, Department of History, Coastal Carolina University
Aneilya Barnes, Department of History, Coastal Carolina University
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Art History - General, Ecclesiastical History, Gender Studies
Paper 1053-bThe Bishop as a Man: Gendered Discourses on Episcopal Power
(Language: English)
Charlotte Lewandowski, Department of History, University of Birmingham
Charlotte Lewandowski, Department of History, University of Birmingham
Charlotte Lewandowski, Department of History, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Gender Studies, Historiography - Medieval
Paper 1053-cMargery Kempe and the Bishops: An Examination of Gendered Rhetoric
(Language: English)
Shannon Stewart, Department of English, Coastal Carolina University
Shannon Stewart, Department of English, Coastal Carolina University
Shannon Stewart, Department of English, Coastal Carolina University
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Gender Studies, Language and Literature - Other
Abstract

This is the first of two panels that will bring together papers that engage with gender, identity, and the medieval bishop or secular clergy. The authors will query when issues or incidences of gender or identity affect the roles of bishops/secular clergy? How did gender or identity affect their ideas, their positions within the Church, or how they related to the world around them? Paper will examine the gendered roles in the Church vis-a-vis bishops; interactions between bishops and lay people with gendered significance; and bishops/secular clergy as embodiments of gendered behaviors; power relationships; or episcopal identities.