IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 106: New Perspectives on Frederick II of Hohenstaufen, I

Monday 1 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Institute of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Durham University
Organiser:Len Scales, Institute of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Durham University
Moderator/Chair:Charlie Rozier, Durham University Institute for Medieval and Early Modern Studies
Paper 106-aThe Role of Crusading in the Conflict between Emperor Frederick II and the Lombard League, 1226-1250
(Language: English)
Gianluca Raccagni, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Gianluca Raccagni, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Gianluca Raccagni, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Index terms: Crusades, Ecclesiastical History, Military History, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 106-bThe Crusade against Frederick II and Conrad IV in Germany, 1246-1251
(Language: English)
Michelle Hufschmid, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
Michelle Hufschmid, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
Michelle Hufschmid, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
Index terms: Crusades, Ecclesiastical History, Military History, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 106-cAnti-Papal Perspectives in the Reign of Frederick II
(Language: English)
Alexander Peplow, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
Alexander Peplow, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
Alexander Peplow, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Language and Literature - Latin, Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

This session examines aspects of the reign of Frederick II of Hohenstaufen (1194-1250), concentrating particularly upon his varied and troubled relations with the Church. Two papers focus upon the role of crusading, particularly on the crusades directed against Frederick both north and south of the Alps. They concentrate particularly upon the role of local and regional actors: the Lombard communes and the German princes and nobility. The third paper reassesses the sources and character of anti-ecclesiastical images in the circles close to the emperor, arguing for the value of concentrating upon tensions between central and local models of Church reform.