IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 112: The Medieval Landscape/Seascape, I: Place and Non-Place

Monday 1 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:The Medieval Landscape/Seascape Group
Organisers:Rachel Elizabeth Swallow, Department of History & Archaeology, University of Chester
John Tighe, Department of History, Trinity College Dublin
Moderator/Chair:Duncan Berryman, School of Geography, Archaeology & Palaeoecology, Queen's University Belfast
Paper 112-aOverlooking and Overlooked: Watch Towers and Castles in a Medieval Welsh Land and Seascape
(Language: English)
Rachel Elizabeth Swallow, Department of History & Archaeology, University of Chester
Rachel Elizabeth Swallow, Department of History & Archaeology, University of Chester
Index terms: Archaeology - Sites, Architecture - Secular, Geography and Settlement Studies
Paper 112-b'Here be... [Norsemen]': Ideas of Unity and the Coherence of Identity Based on Places across the Sea in 19th-Century Historical Writing
(Language: English)
Karl Christian Alvestad, Department of History, University of Winchester
Karl Christian Alvestad, Department of History, University of Winchester
Index terms: Geography and Settlement Studies, Maritime and Naval Studies, Teaching the Middle Ages
Paper 112-cWhat's in a Name?: Folklore and the Landscape in West Connacht, Ireland
(Language: English)
John Tighe, Department of History, Trinity College Dublin
John Tighe, Department of History, Trinity College Dublin
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Folk Studies, Geography and Settlement Studies, Local History
Abstract

Writing about the medieval landscape and environment has a rich and long tradition and is an area in which many of the disciplines that comprise medieval studies have made significant contributions. Scholars working on ideas of the landscape, concepts of space and place as well as in the developing field of environmental humanities have added to our theoretical framework for understanding people’s relationships with the environment in the past. This session will focus on the creation and memory of cultural landscapes through the study of the physical landscape and oral/literate traditions.