IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1120: The Body and the Text: Medical Humanities and Medieval Literature, c. 1150-1550, II

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO) / Medical Humanities Research Centre (MHRC), Swansea University
Organisers:Laura Kalas Williams, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Alison Williams, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Moderator/Chair:Alison Williams, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Paper 1120-a'Fet fin amur et concorde entre home and feme': Natural Philosophy and Medical Intertextuality in Yale University, MS Beinecke 492
(Language: English)
Theresa Lorraine Tyers, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Theresa Lorraine Tyers, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Theresa Lorraine Tyers, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Medicine
Paper 1120-bTextual Medicine in Medieval England: Charms and the Body
(Language: English)
Katherine Hindley, Medieval Studies, Yale University
Katherine Hindley, Medieval Studies, Yale University
Katherine Hindley, Medieval Studies, Yale University
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Language and Literature - Middle English, Medicine
Paper 1120-cMedicine, Miracle, and Muddled Methodology
(Language: English)
Jude Seal, Independent Scholar, York
Jude Seal, Independent Scholar, York
Jude Seal, Independent Scholar, York
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Medicine
Abstract

This panel is one in a series of sessions which seeks to investigate how medicine, health and wellbeing are represented in medieval literature, and how literary texts from this period contribute to training and practice in the Medical Humanities. This panel focuses on manuscript evidence in Latin, Anglo-Latin, Anglo-Saxon, and Old French. Boundaries between disciplines (natural philosophy and medicine), body and soul, and bodies and texts are investigated. The session also considers how manuscript evidence encourages an individually nuanced approach to disease and disability in the Middle Ages.