IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1138: Harnessing the Authority of the Devotional Object

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Prato Consortium for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Organiser:Jennifer Lord, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Moderator/Chair:Miri Rubin, School of History, Queen Mary, University of London
Paper 1138-a'I bequeath the book of our holy mother to…': A Unique Codex as Source of Status and Authority in a 14th-Century Provençal Beguinage
(Language: English)
Jennifer Lord, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Jennifer Lord, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Index terms: Gender Studies, Literacy and Orality, Religious Life
Paper 1138-b'This divine figure performed and continues to perform miracles…': Devotional Objects and the Miraculous in Italian Convent Chronicles
(Language: English)
Rosa Martorana, School of Philosophical, Historical & International Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Rosa Martorana, School of Philosophical, Historical & International Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Index terms: Gender Studies, Liturgy, Religious Life
Paper 1138-cThe Power of the Statue: Veneration of the Virgin of Le Puy as a Means of Influence over Medieval Languedoc
(Language: English)
Mimi Petrakis, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Mimi Petrakis, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Index terms: Art History - General, Religious Life
Abstract

This session offers case studies of how material objects such as relics, books, and statues were recruited to perform immaterial functions, in Italy and France in the late medieval and early modern periods. For women, religious devotional objects mediated the space between heaven and earth, while connecting their communal past with their present and future form of life. Political actors could make use of cult objects to consolidate regional power bases and allegiances in both practical and symbolic ways. The three papers will consider how particular devotional objects not only structured religious observance but also came to confer status, authority, and power on those who controlled or claimed them.