IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1141: Text as Material Artefacts: Archaeology of 'Materiality' as a Research Concept, 15th-21st Century, II

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Organiser:Christoph Egger, Institut für Österreichische Geschichtsforschung, Universität Wien
Moderator/Chair:Dominique Stutzmann, Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes (IRHT), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Paper 1141-aMaterial Texts or Virtual Objects?: Descriptions in Later Medieval and Early Modern Catalogues and Inventories
(Language: English)
Hanno Wijsman, Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes (IRHT), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Hanno Wijsman, Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes (IRHT), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Hanno Wijsman, Institut de Recherche et d'Histoire des Textes (IRHT), Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Paris
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1141-bManuscript Materiality, Description, and Data Modeling: The Schoenberg Database as a Historiographical Resource
(Language: English)
Lisa Fagin Davis, Medieval Academy of America, Massachusetts
Lisa Fagin Davis, Medieval Academy of America, Massachusetts
Lisa Fagin Davis, Medieval Academy of America, Massachusetts
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Historiography - Modern Scholarship, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

Texts are at the same time an idea and a form. The latter is the result of a combination of inherited social uses and specific intentions by the various actors involved in transmitting the text as idea. All textual artefacts are concerned: manuscripts, charters, inscriptions, tapestries, seals, coins, etc. The present session explores the pre-historical time of ‘materiality’ as a research concept and how historians, palaeographers and diplomatists have taken the dual nature of the text into account in the past. H. Wijsman studies past catalogues and the descriptions of books present in a selection of inventories, catalogues and other sources from the 14th to the 18th century, in order to see how books and texts were seen and described. L. F. Davis explores how the Schoenberg Database encodes the history of manuscript cataloguing from the earliest analogue descriptions to modern authority- and IIIF-compliance.