IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1143: A Global Trecento: Objects, Artists, and Ideas across Europe, the Mediterranean, and Beyond, II - Central Italy, France, and the Adriatic

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:University of Edinburgh
Organisers:Claudia Bolgia, Edinburgh College of Art, University of Edinburgh
Luca Palozzi, Edinburgh College of Art, University of Edinburgh
Moderator/Chair:Frances Andrews, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Paper 1143-aSienese Altarpieces and the Trans-Regional Dissemination of the Iconography of the Coronation of the Virgin
(Language: English)
Kayoko Ichikawa, Department of History of Art, University of Warwick
Kayoko Ichikawa, Department of History of Art, University of Warwick
Index terms: Art History - General, Art History - Painting, Social History
Paper 1143-bRevising Artistic Relationships between Rome and Avignon in the Trecento: The Movement of Patrons and Artists
(Language: English)
Claudia Bolgia, Edinburgh College of Art, University of Edinburgh
Claudia Bolgia, Edinburgh College of Art, University of Edinburgh
Index terms: Art History - Painting, Ecclesiastical History, Historiography - Medieval, Social History
Paper 1143-cMulti-Culturalism in the Patriarchate of Aquileia: Rethinking the Trecento in a Global Perspective
(Language: English)
Zuleika Murat, Dipartimento dei Beni Culturali, Università degli Studi di Padova
Zuleika Murat, Dipartimento dei Beni Culturali, Università degli Studi di Padova
Index terms: Art History - Painting, Art History - Sculpture, Historiography - Medieval, Social History
Abstract

This is the second a four-session series aiming to discuss how the transformative character of the Trecento is indebted to cultural exchanges, movement of artists and patrons, circulation of models and ideas across Italy, Europe, the Mediterranean and beyond. This session focuses on Central Italy, France, and the Adriatic. Paper -a discusses the transregional dissemination of the iconography of the Coronation of the Virgin. Paper -b introduces a hitherto neglected artwork to revise our understanding of the artistic relationship between Rome and Avignon. Paper -c reassesses the art of the Patriarcate of Aquileia in the light of its multi-linguistic and multi-ethnic nature.