IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1153: Gender, Identity, and the Medieval Bishop/Secular Clergy, II

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:EPISCOPUS: Society for the Study of Bishops and Secular Clergy in the Middle Ages
Organiser:Evan Gatti, Department of Art & Art History, Elon University, North Carolina
Moderator/Chair:Aneilya Barnes, Department of History, Coastal Carolina University
Paper 1153-aRemembering the Examples of Christ, St Peter, St Paul, St Martin, St Gregory Nazianzen, St Laurence, St Augustine of Canterbury, and Archbishop Lanfranc: Notions of Identity and Reenactment
(Language: English)
Sally N. Vaughn, Department of History, University of Houston, Texas
Sally N. Vaughn, Department of History, University of Houston, Texas
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Gender Studies, Historiography - Medieval
Paper 1153-bThe Medieval Bishops of Bangor, 1092-1307: Tested Loyalties - Identity and Ethnicity
(Language: English)
Shaun David McGuinness, School of History, Philosophy & Social Sciences, Bangor University
Shaun David McGuinness, School of History, Philosophy & Social Sciences, Bangor University
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Historiography - Medieval
Paper 1153-cA Dreadful and Devout Labor: Doing Priests’ Laundry in the Carolingian World
(Language: English)
Valerie Garver, Department of History, Northern Illinois University
Valerie Garver, Department of History, Northern Illinois University
Index terms: Daily Life, Ecclesiastical History, Gender Studies, Religious Life, Women's Studies
Abstract

This is the second of two panels that will bring together papers that engage with gender, identity, and the medieval bishop or secular clergy. The authors will query when issues or incidences of gender or identity affect the roles of bishops/secular clergy? How did gender or identity affect their ideas, their positions within the Church, or how they related to the world around them? Paper will examine the gendered roles in the Church vis-a-vis bishops; interactions between bishops and lay people with gendered significance; and bishops/secular clergy as embodiments of gendered behaviors; power relationships; or episcopal identities.