IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1222: Gender and Domesticity, III: Gender, Space, and the Great House

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 14.15-15.45

Organiser:Rachel Delman, University College, University of Oxford
Moderator/Chair:Chris Woolgar, Department of History / Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Culture, University of Southampton
Paper 1222-a'A bedde of arres of the Whele of Fortune . . . a guirdell of purple tissue with a broken bokull': Observing Reputations and Relationships through the Material Culture of Cecily, Duchess of York's Household
(Language: English)
Joanna Louise Laynesmith, Independent Scholar, Reading
Joanna Louise Laynesmith, Independent Scholar, Reading
Joanna Louise Laynesmith, Independent Scholar, Reading
Index terms: Architecture - Secular, Daily Life, Gender Studies, Women's Studies
Paper 1222-bCastle Building and the Materiality of Queenship in Late Medieval Britain
(Language: English)
Rachel Delman, University College, University of Oxford
Rachel Delman, University College, University of Oxford
Rachel Delman, University College, University of Oxford
Index terms: Archaeology - Sites, Architecture - Secular, Gender Studies, Women's Studies
Paper 1222-c'Earning your spurs': A Gendered Study of Material Culture at Castles
(Language: English)
Karen Dempsey, School of Archaeology, Geography & Environmental Science, University of Reading
Karen Dempsey, School of Archaeology, Geography & Environmental Science, University of Reading
Karen Dempsey, School of Archaeology, Geography & Environmental Science, University of Reading
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Gender Studies, Women's Studies
Abstract

This is the third of three sessions which explore gender, space, and the materiality of domesticity in late medieval Britain. Drawing upon a variety of sources – material, documentary, literary – and focusing on a range of houses from across the social spectrum, they collectively consider how behaviours and ideologies, gender and social relations were shaped and articulated through domestic spaces and objects. This session turns its focus to very high status houses (including castles), to the residences of nobles and of queens. It explores the relationship between women and buildings as lived spaces, as projections of identity and status, and as objects of patronage. It also looks beyond buildings to consider parks and the degree to which these constituted female space.