IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 123: Material Textuality: Manuscripts as Sources of Cultural History

Monday 1 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Bristol
Organiser:Ad Putter, Department of English, University of Bristol
Moderator/Chair:Ad Putter, Department of English, University of Bristol
Paper 123-aIacob and Iosep and Its French Neighbours: Bodleian Library, MS Bodley 652 and 13th-Century Literary Culture
(Language: English)
Cathy Hume, Department of English, University of Bristol
Cathy Hume, Department of English, University of Bristol
Cathy Hume, Department of English, University of Bristol
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 123-bLondon, Lambeth Palace Library, MS 853 and the Competing Demands of Anthology Compilation
(Language: English)
Anne Baden-Daintree, Department of English, University of Bristol
Anne Baden-Daintree, Department of English, University of Bristol
Anne Baden-Daintree, Department of English, University of Bristol
Index terms: Language and Literature - Middle English, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life
Paper 123-cSir John Prise's Manuscript Collection and Tudor British History
(Language: English)
Helen Fulton, Department of English, University of Bristol
Helen Fulton, Department of English, University of Bristol
Helen Fulton, Department of English, University of Bristol
Index terms: Language and Literature - Celtic, Language and Literature - Latin, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Medievalism and Antiquarianism
Abstract

This session uses the evidence of material texts to ask broader questions about literary, religious, and intellectual life in the medieval and early Tudor period. Based on the study of medieval manuscript miscellanies and manuscript collections, the three papers discuss the bilingual literary culture of 13th-century England, the culture of private devotion in later medieval England, and the role the manuscripts collected by Sir John Prise (after the dissolution of the monasteries) played in shaping his vision of British history.