IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1237: Materialities of Reign: Charters as Proxies for Political Negotiation Processes in Central and 'Peripheral' Regions of Latin Europe, I - Western and Southern European Perspectives

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 14.15-15.45

Organiser:Sven Jaros, Historisches Seminar, Universität Leipzig
Moderator/Chair:Anne Greule, Historische Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
Paper 1237-aChristian, Muslim, and Jewish Mediators in Interreligious Communication Processes in the Kingdom of Valencia, 1238-1285
(Language: English)
Eric Böhme, Historisches Seminar, Universität Leipzig
Eric Böhme, Historisches Seminar, Universität Leipzig
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Islamic and Arabic Studies, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1237-bCarrot and Stick: The Angevins between Old and New Elites in the Kingdom of Sicily
(Language: English)
Marie Jaros, Historisches Seminar, Universität Leipzig
Marie Jaros, Historisches Seminar, Universität Leipzig
Index terms: Administration, Charters and Diplomatics, Genealogy and Prosopography, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1237-cCrusade to Catalonia: The Roussillon between the Kings of Mallorca, Aragón, and France
(Language: English)
Robert Friedrich, German Historical Institute, Paris
Robert Friedrich, German Historical Institute, Paris
Index terms: Administration, Charters and Diplomatics, Crusades, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

Integration of approaches from social and cultural history has revived research into medieval reign in recent years. Reign is now mainly perceived as a discursive practice by a group of heterogeneous actors, each with distinct motivations and networks. Since this stresses the importance of communicative proximity, actors had to cope with the challenge of spatial distance, necessitating both acts and agents of mediation. The processes involved often materialized in the issuing of charters. Hence, diplomatic analyses can contribute greatly to displaying these negotiation processes. In our session, we will pursue this approach by comparing case studies from various regions of Latin Europe, representing its internal diversity.