IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 124: Manuscript Rolls: New Digital and Scientific Approaches

Monday 1 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (ANZAMEMS) / Centre for the Study of Religion & Conflict, Nottingham Trent University
Organiser:Natasha Ruth Hodgson, School of Arts & Humanities, Nottingham Trent University
Moderator/Chair:Katherine J. Lewis, Department of History, University of Huddersfield
Paper 124-aNew Zealand's Canterbury Roll: A Case Study in Digitisation
(Language: English)
Chris Jones, Department of History, University of Canterbury, Christchurch
Chris Jones, Department of History, University of Canterbury, Christchurch
Chris Jones, Department of History, University of Canterbury, Christchurch
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Genealogy and Prosopography, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Teaching the Middle Ages
Paper 124-bScientific Imaging and Spectroscopic Analysis of the Canterbury Roll: Some Preliminary Results
(Language: English)
Haida Liang, Department of Physics, Nottingham Trent University
Haida Liang, Department of Physics, Nottingham Trent University
Haida Liang, Department of Physics, Nottingham Trent University
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Genealogy and Prosopography, Science, Technology
Paper 124-cContextualising the Canterbury Roll with the 'Noah' Tradition of 15th-Century Royal Genealogies
(Language: English)
Natasha Ruth Hodgson, School of Arts & Humanities, Nottingham Trent University
Natasha Ruth Hodgson, School of Arts & Humanities, Nottingham Trent University
Natasha Ruth Hodgson, School of Arts & Humanities, Nottingham Trent University
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Genealogy and Prosopography, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Political Thought
Abstract

The Canterbury Roll is one of a limited group of genealogical manuscripts produced during the Wars of the Roses in which the royal line starts with Noah. Little is known about its provenance beyond its purchase from the Maude family by the University of Canterbury (NZ) in 1918. In 2017, UC and Nottingham Trent developed an international project to develop an enhanced digital edition and explore a number of unsolved historical queries. This cross-disciplinary session will reveal preliminary results from digitisation processes, non-invasive scientific imaging, spectroscopic techniques, and historical research. It also aims to stimulate discussions about the future of manuscript roll digitisation.