IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1242: Moving About: The Meaning of Movements for Medieval Societies in the North

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:'Creating the New North' Research Programme, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitet
Organiser:Marte Spangen, Institutt for arkeologi, historie, religionsvitenskap og teologi, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitet
Moderator/Chair:John McNicol, Department of Archaeology, Conservation & History, UiT the Artic University of Norway
Paper 1242-aAbout Moving: Mobility and Being in the Landscapes of the High North
(Language: English)
Marte Spangen, Institutt for arkeologi, historie, religionsvitenskap og teologi, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitet
Marte Spangen, Institutt for arkeologi, historie, religionsvitenskap og teologi, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitet
Marte Spangen, Institutt for arkeologi, historie, religionsvitenskap og teologi, Universitetet i Tromsø - Norges Arktiske Universitet
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Daily Life, Economics - Rural, Mentalities
Paper 1242-bMobility and the Sacred in the Towns of the North
(Language: English)
Visa Immonen, Department of Philosophy, History, Culture & Art Studies, University of Helsinki
Visa Immonen, Department of Philosophy, History, Culture & Art Studies, University of Helsinki
Visa Immonen, Department of Philosophy, History, Culture & Art Studies, University of Helsinki
Index terms: Archaeology - General, Architecture - Religious, Daily Life
Paper 1242-cNorthern Agency in Medieval Long-Distance Trade: Rethinking Fish, Fur, and Ivory
(Language: English)
James Barrett, McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge
James Barrett, McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge
James Barrett, McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Archaeology - General, Daily Life, Economics - Trade
Abstract

Over the last two decades, the social sciences have witnessed what has been labelled the ‘mobility turn’. This new focus on the importance of movement and mobility is partly inspired by the new migrations taking place in our current world. The concept, however, includes theorizing the more profound importance of movement to how humans perceive and constitute society and the world. In archaeology, this theoretical influx is paralleled by a methodological improvements that allow us to trace the specific movements of people, animals, and things through for instance a DNA and stable isotope analyses. This session will discuss the wider implications of these developments for how we understand medieval societies in the North.