IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 126: The Materiality of Law Manuscripts, I: Systematization and Compilation of Legal Manuscripts

Monday 1 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Project 'Transformations of Medieval Law', Bergen Research Foundation / Universitetet i Bergen
Organiser:Helen F. Leslie-Jacobsen, Institutt for lingvistiske, litterære og estetiske studier, Universitetet i Bergen
Moderator/Chair:Elizabeth Walgenbach, Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies, Reykjavík
Paper 126-aThe Lübeck Law Codex of Albrecht von Bardewik, c. 1294
(Language: English)
Albrecht Cordes, Institut für Rechtsgeschichte, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main
Albrecht Cordes, Institut für Rechtsgeschichte, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main
Albrecht Cordes, Institut für Rechtsgeschichte, Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main
Index terms: Administration, Language and Literature - German, Law, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 126-bNicolaus de Ausmo's Supplementum Summae Pisanellae Manuscript: The Scribe, Reader, and User of the Codex
(Language: English)
Oleksandr Okhrimenko, Department of Ancient & Medieval History, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv
Oleksandr Okhrimenko, Department of Ancient & Medieval History, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv
Oleksandr Okhrimenko, Department of Ancient & Medieval History, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv
Index terms: Administration, Law, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 126-cThe Evolution of the Compilation of Leiðangr Law in Medieval Scandinavia
(Language: English)
Beñat Elortza, Centre for Scandinavian Studies, Department of History, University of Aberdeen
Beñat Elortza, Centre for Scandinavian Studies, Department of History, University of Aberdeen
Beñat Elortza, Centre for Scandinavian Studies, Department of History, University of Aberdeen
Index terms: Administration, Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Law, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

This session aims to explore the compilation and systematization of manuscripts containing legal texts. Law codes circulated in manuscript form bound into manuscript books with other texts, often those related to legal matters, to form compilations. The choice and order of texts in many manuscripts can tell us something about the cultural context of the law, and how the law was understood, applied and interpreted. Law codes themselves can also be systematised, introducing, for example, linear lines of thought to the text, and aids such as indices and rubrics. This helps us understand the tradition and shaping of the law and innovations in its codicological transmission.