IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1307: Rulership in Medieval East Central Europe, III: Influences from Outside

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 16.30-18.00

Organiser:Grischa Vercamer, Tadeusz Manteuffel Institute of History, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa
Moderator/Chair:Dušan Zupka, Institute of History, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava
Paper 1307-aHoly Roman Empire and East Central Europe (High Middle Ages): Politics and Influences
(Language: English)
Grischa Vercamer, Tadeusz Manteuffel Institute of History, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa
Grischa Vercamer, Tadeusz Manteuffel Institute of History, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa
Grischa Vercamer, Tadeusz Manteuffel Institute of History, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warszawa
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy, Social History
Paper 1307-bHoly Roman Empire and East Central Europe (Late Middle Ages): Politics and Influences
(Language: English)
Stephan Flemmig, Historisches Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
Stephan Flemmig, Historisches Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
Stephan Flemmig, Historisches Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
Index terms: Mentalities, Political Thought, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1307-cThe Mongol Experience of East Central Europe in Image and Political Reality
(Language: English)
Felicitas Schmieder, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität Hagen
Felicitas Schmieder, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität Hagen
Felicitas Schmieder, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität Hagen
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Political Thought, Social History
Abstract

Culturally and socially, East Central Europe was clearly a part of Latin Europe. Clergy and scholars used Latin as the lingua franca and on different social levels, such as higher and lower nobility, scholars, or the urban population, there was a constant exchange of people. With them, their knowledge, skills and all sorts of expertise, resulting in similarities in urban culture as well as the way of life of noble elites migrated. East Central Europe as a distinctive region existed within a specific context, closely linked and strongly influenced by its Germanic, Slavonic, Byzantine, and nomadic neighbours. This session will reflect the political, intellectual and religious influences from these neighbours, especially from the Holy Roman Empire and the Golden Horde.