IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1310: Medieval Romance Relationships, IV: Incest and Adultery

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 16.30-18.00

Organisers:Rachel Fennell, Institute of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Durham University
Hannah Piercy, Institute of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Durham University
Moderator/Chair:Rachel Fennell, Institute of Medieval & Early Modern Studies, Durham University
Paper 1310-aWerewolves, Adulterous Queens, and Symbolic Cannibals: A Comparative Reading of Arthur and Gorlagon and Jóns saga leikara
(Language: English)
Minjie Su, Faculty of English Language & Literature, University of Oxford
Minjie Su, Faculty of English Language & Literature, University of Oxford
Index terms: Language and Literature - Comparative, Language and Literature - Latin, Language and Literature - Scandinavian
Paper 1310-bOf Milk and Blood: The Changing Nature of the Lovers' Relationship in Two German Adaptations of Floire und Blancheflor
(Language: English)
Antonia Murath, Friedrich Schlegel Gradiertenschule für literaturwissenschaftliche Studien, Freie Universität Berlin
Antonia Murath, Friedrich Schlegel Gradiertenschule für literaturwissenschaftliche Studien, Freie Universität Berlin
Index terms: Language and Literature - Comparative, Language and Literature - German, Sexuality
Paper 1310-cIncestuous Fathers / Suffering Daughters in La Belle Hélène de Constantinople
(Language: English)
Stephanie Grace-Petinos, Institute for Research in the Humanities, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Stephanie Grace-Petinos, Institute for Research in the Humanities, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Index terms: Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Lay Piety, Sexuality
Abstract

The final panel in this series considers the topics of incest and adultery in medieval romance afresh. Minjie Su compares the punishment of adultery in the linked texts Arthur and Gorlagon and Jóns saga leikara to consider the possible reasons for its different treatment in each narrative. Antonia Murath similarly focuses on textual adaptation, considering the increasingly transgressive portrayal of Floire and Blancheflor’s relationship in two German versions of this romance alongside its hagiographical resonances. Stephanie Grace-Petinos concludes this panel by considering the relationships between two incestuous fathers and their daughters in ‘La Belle Hélène de Constantinople’.