IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1323: Approaches to Miscellaneous Religious Manuals: Religious Change and Pastoral Revolution in 15th-Century England

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Medieval Heresy & Dissent Research Network, University of Nottingham / Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Studies, University of Kent
Organiser:Rob Lutton, Department of History, University of Nottingham
Moderator/Chair:Jennifer Brown, Department of English, Marymount Manhattan College, New York
Paper 1323-aLollardy and the Holy Name of Jesus: Christocentric and Wycliffite Texts in 15th-Century English 'Miscellaneous Manuals'
(Language: English)
Rob Lutton, Department of History, University of Nottingham
Rob Lutton, Department of History, University of Nottingham
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life, Social History
Paper 1323-b'Miscellaneous Manuals' and London's Pastoral Revolution, I: Codicological
(Language: English)
Ryan Perry, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Studies (MEMS), University of Kent
Ryan Perry, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Studies (MEMS), University of Kent
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life, Social History
Paper 1323-c'Miscellaneous Manuals' and London's Pastoral Revolution, II: Social
(Language: English)
Stephen Kelly, School of English, Queen's University Belfast
Stephen Kelly, School of English, Queen's University Belfast
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Religious Life, Social History
Abstract

This session is rooted in research on the material, textual, and cultural circumstances of an extraordinary corpus of Middle English books. Known as ‘miscellaneous manuals’, ‘pastoral handbooks’ or ‘devotional anthologies’, these books were produced in large numbers in 15th-century England. The first paper explores the juxtaposition of Christocentric and Wycliffite texts in devotional miscellanies. The last two will form a diptych that examines distinct aspects – codicological and social – of the emergence of significant numbers of these books in 15th-century London and suggest new ways for understanding the corpus in respect of key members of London’s citizenry and the City’s prelacy.