IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1337: Materialities of Reign: Charters as Proxies for Political Negotiation Processes in Central and 'Peripheral' Regions of Latin Europe, II: Central, Northern, and Eastern European Perspectives

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 16.30-18.00

Organiser:Sven Jaros, Historisches Seminar, Universität Leipzig
Moderator/Chair:Robert Friedrich, German Historical Institute, Paris
Paper 1337-aNegotiating Power and Reign?: The Initial Poem in the Golden Bull of Charles IV and Its Material Conditions
(Language: English)
Anne Greule, Historische Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
Anne Greule, Historische Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Language and Literature - Latin, Mentalities, Rhetoric
Paper 1337-bMediating the Union: Mid-Level Agency and Elites in Late Medieval Norway during the Early Reign of King Erik III
(Language: English)
Stefan Magnussen, Historisches Seminar, Universität Leipzig
Stefan Magnussen, Historisches Seminar, Universität Leipzig
Index terms: Administration, Charters and Diplomatics, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1337-cLiteracy and Orality as Elements of Negotiating Land Ownership in Early Jagiellonian Crown Ruthenia
(Language: English)
Sven Jaros, Historisches Seminar, Universität Leipzig
Sven Jaros, Historisches Seminar, Universität Leipzig
Index terms: Administration, Charters and Diplomatics, Literacy and Orality, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

Integration of approaches from social and cultural history has revived research into medieval reign in recent years. Reign is now mainly perceived as a discursive practice by a group of heterogeneous actors, each with distinct motivations and networks. Since this stresses the importance of communicative proximity, actors had to cope with the challenge of spatial distance, necessitating both acts and agents of mediation. The processes involved often materialized in the issuing of charters. Hence, diplomatic analyses can contribute greatly to displaying these negotiation processes. In our session, we will pursue this approach by comparing case studies from various regions of Latin Europe, representing its internal diversity.