IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1340: Byzantine Materialities, IV: Workshops, Trade, and Manuscripts

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, University of Birmingham
Organiser:Leslie Brubaker, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies / Institute of Archaeology & Antiquity, University of Birmingham
Moderator/Chair:Rebecca Darley, Department of History, Classics & Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London
Paper 1340-aMacedonian Materialities: The Menologion of Basil II
(Language: English)
Shaun Tougher, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Shaun Tougher, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Shaun Tougher, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Index terms: Byzantine Studies, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Social History
Paper 1340-bMaterial Evidence for Middle Byzantine Commerce
(Language: English)
Chris Wickham, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
Chris Wickham, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
Chris Wickham, Faculty of History, University of Oxford
Index terms: Archaeology - Artefacts, Byzantine Studies, Economics - Trade
Paper 1340-cMen at Work: Stucco Workshops on Mount Athos
(Language: English)
Flavia Vanni, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, Department of Classics, Ancient History & Archaeology, University of Birmingham
Flavia Vanni, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, Department of Classics, Ancient History & Archaeology, University of Birmingham
Flavia Vanni, Centre for Byzantine, Ottoman & Modern Greek Studies, Department of Classics, Ancient History & Archaeology, University of Birmingham
Index terms: Architecture - General, Art History - Sculpture, Byzantine Studies
Abstract

This session is the last of four interconnected panels concerned with Byzantine Materiality. Here we return to trade, exchange and workshops making Byzantine materials. The session opens with a paper on the well-known Menologion of Basil II (c.1000), a joint product of several painters identified in the manuscript itself; the paper explores the implications of communal workshop practice in a very deluxe setting. The second paper moves away from the palace and back to the docks and streets to look at what archaeology – the most material of Byzantine disciplines – tells us about commerce in the Middle Byzantine period. It has long been argued that the Byzantines distained commerce: this paper debunks that notion, on the basis of a profound understanding of Byzantine Materiality. The final paper moves the discussion of Byzantine materials to late Byzantine Constantinople, with an exploration of hitherto unpublished brick and kiln evidence.