IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1348: Medieval Epistolography, II

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Department of History, King's College London / Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Organisers:Thomas William Smith, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Anaïs Waag, Department of History, King's College London
Moderator/Chair:Thomas William Smith, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Paper 1348-aDictamen and the English Chancery in the Reign of Henry III: Early Influences and Precursors, 1230-1250
(Language: English)
Lucy Hennings, Exeter College, University of Oxford
Lucy Hennings, Exeter College, University of Oxford
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Language and Literature - Latin, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1348-bThe Construction of Male-Female Relationships in the Letters of 13th-Century European Royal and Aristocratic Women
(Language: English)
Iona Baker, School of Humanities, University of Glasgow
Iona Baker, School of Humanities, University of Glasgow
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Gender Studies, Language and Literature - Latin, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1348-cThe Message and the Messenger: The Correspondence of Edward I
(Language: English)
Kathleen Neal, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Kathleen Neal, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Language and Literature - Latin, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

As an essential tool for communication in the Middle Ages, letters are a crucial historical source, broadly and frequently used by medievalists. And yet, there is still much to understand about medieval letters and the letter writing process. How exactly were medieval letters, particularly missives, composed and created? What was the relationship between sender, scribe and chancery? How do epistolary theory and practice intersect? These two sessions Medieval Epistolography I and II seek to explore and answer these questions, and to find common ground between medievalists’ many ways of approaching letters.