IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1352: Where the Sea Meets the Land: Social Networks and Exchanges in the Medieval Mediterranean

Wednesday 3 July 2019, 16.30-18.00

Organisers:Pol Junyent Molins, Institució Milà i Fontanals (IMF), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Barcelona
Jessica Tearney-Pearce, Woolf Institute, Cambridge / St John's College, University of Cambridge
Moderator/Chair:Michael Carr, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Paper 1352-aTerrestrial Prayers for Nautical Protection: What is Maritime Religion in the Medieval Mediterranean?
(Language: English)
Jessica Tearney-Pearce, Woolf Institute, Cambridge / St John's College, University of Cambridge
Jessica Tearney-Pearce, Woolf Institute, Cambridge / St John's College, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Maritime and Naval Studies, Religious Life, Social History
Paper 1352-bIntercommunity Boundaries: Social Groups, Motivations, and On-Board Life Regulation of the Royal Aragonese Fleets in the Late Medieval Western Mediterranean
(Language: English)
Pol Junyent Molins, Institució Milà i Fontanals (IMF), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Barcelona
Pol Junyent Molins, Institució Milà i Fontanals (IMF), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Barcelona
Index terms: Genealogy and Prosopography, Maritime and Naval Studies, Military History, Social History
Paper 1352-cHospitality and Multiculturality in a Medieval Port City: The Foreign Patients of the Hospital of the Holy Cross of Barcelona
(Language: English)
Pol Bridgewater Mateu, Departament d'Història i Arqueologia / Institut de Recerca en Cultures Medievals, Universitat de Barcelona
Pol Bridgewater Mateu, Departament d'Història i Arqueologia / Institut de Recerca en Cultures Medievals, Universitat de Barcelona
Index terms: Daily Life, Social History
Abstract

The papers in this panel will highlight and examine interactions among medieval people in maritime contexts between whom there are what could be perceived to be borders and boundaries. However, in contrast to much research which focuses on those, more negative, boundaries and difference, the emphasis here will be placed on the, more positive, interactions and connections – in particular at ‘maritime’/’terrestrial’ intersections. By their very nature centres of maritime activity in the medieval Mediterranean were foci for communication and the development, utilisation, and manipulation of communities and networks. As the papers will show, the evidence exists (although often it is no longer extant) in various media including written narratives, trade agreements, and ships’ registers as well as the objects, spaces, and places where these networks were formed and the interactions enacted.