IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 137: Royal Ceremony in the Middle Ages, I: Materiality

Monday 1 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Organiser:Florence Scott, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Moderator/Chair:Samuel Bradley, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Paper 137-aThe Images and Insignia of Inauguration in Late Anglo-Saxon and Early Anglo-Norman England
(Language: English)
Florence Scott, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Florence Scott, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Florence Scott, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Index terms: Political Thought, Social History
Paper 137-bRoyal Virtues and Queenly Performances: Judith and Esther as Models of Queenship in France, 13th-14th Centuries
(Language: English)
Juliana Amorim Goskes, Department of History, New York University
Juliana Amorim Goskes, Department of History, New York University
Juliana Amorim Goskes, Department of History, New York University
Index terms: Architecture - Religious, Political Thought, Women's Studies
Paper 137-cThe Use and Decoration of Horse Barding in Royal Tournaments
(Language: English)
Eleanor Jayne Wilkinson-Keys, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Eleanor Jayne Wilkinson-Keys, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Eleanor Jayne Wilkinson-Keys, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Index terms: Heraldry, Military History
Abstract

This session is part of the ‘Royal Ceremony in the Middle Ages’ strand, the aim of which is to explore the participants, audience, and materialities involved in royal ceremony, and analyse its wider political and religious significance across space and time. The objects and visual material that were used within ceremonies or created contemporaneously can be effective and enlightening windows into our understanding of royal power and imagery. This session thus seeks to assess the royal ceremony as a time and space in which monarchy is received by an audience and becomes visible, tangible and material.