IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 143: Medieval Materialism: Trade and Markets

Monday 1 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:14th Century Society
Organiser:Marie D'Aguanno Ito, Department of History, American University, Washington, DC
Moderator/Chair:Maria Theisen, Institut für Mittelalterforschung, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien
Paper 143-aThe 'Almodí': A Holistic Approach to Grain Warehouses and Distribution Points in Towns of the Crown of Aragon during the 14th-15th Centuries
(Language: English)
Pablo José Alcover Cateura, Departament d'Història Medieval, Paleografia i Diplomàtica, Universitat de Barcelona
Pablo José Alcover Cateura, Departament d'Història Medieval, Paleografia i Diplomàtica, Universitat de Barcelona
Index terms: Daily Life, Economics - General, Economics - Trade, Economics - Urban
Paper 143-bThe Saffron Trade between Catalonia, Montpellier, and Paris in the 14th Century
(Language: English)
Debra Ann Salata, Visiting Scholar, University of Minnesota
Debra Ann Salata, Visiting Scholar, University of Minnesota
Index terms: Daily Life, Economics - General, Economics - Trade, Economics - Urban
Paper 143-cThe Markets of Late Medieval Florence
(Language: English)
Marie D'Aguanno Ito, Department of History, American University, Washington, DC
Marie D'Aguanno Ito, Department of History, American University, Washington, DC
Index terms: Daily Life, Economics - General, Economics - Trade, Economics - Urban
Abstract

Commerce and markets constituted important aspects of the late medieval material world. Trade often involved sophisticated international networks, with an extensive number of commodities. The distribution systems attached to the trading networks were often well organized, well regulated, and efficient, serving the needs of their respective populaces and governing bodies. The panel’s three papers will focus on these issues. The first paper discusses the Almodi (grain warehouses and distribution points) in the Crown of Aragon, including their creation, expansion (with maps), operations, local magistrates, and relations with urban authorities. The second paper considers the saffron trade between Catalonia (for production), Montpellier (for re-export), and Paris and Avignon (for consumption). The third paper analyzes the numerous markets of late medieval Florence, including their organization, functions, products, consumer bases, regulation, and integration. Collectively the papers seek to provide a better understanding of particular aspects of late medieval trade and markets.