IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1506: Re-Instituting the Institutions, II: Observing Administrative Structures in Medieval Texts and Records

Thursday 4 July 2019, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Pipe Roll Society
Organisers:Jack Newman, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Studies (MEMS), University of Kent
Edward Woodhouse, School of History, University of East Anglia
Moderator/Chair:Jeremy Piercy, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Paper 1506-aReturning to the Rolls: King John's Chancery and Clerks in Normandy
(Language: English)
Edward Woodhouse, School of History, University of East Anglia
Edward Woodhouse, School of History, University of East Anglia
Index terms: Administration, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1506-bWitnessing for the Lady: Identifying Noblewomen's Administrations through Charter Evidence
(Language: English)
Linda E. Mitchell, Department of History, University of Missouri, Kansas City
Linda E. Mitchell, Department of History, University of Missouri, Kansas City
Index terms: Administration, Charters and Diplomatics, Gender Studies
Paper 1506-cAll The King's Men: The Origins and Objectives of the Custodial Experiment of 1204
(Language: English)
Dan Booker, Department of History, University of Bristol
Dan Booker, Department of History, University of Bristol
Index terms: Administration, Economics - General, Political Thought
Abstract

Administrative and institutional history, as a long-standing field in medieval studies, requires us to return to the material documentation to explore new ideas and perspectives towards the institutions. We can only truly understand these institutions by examining the materials they left behind; including the many records they produced. This session will provide a platform for the discussion of issues relating to new perspectives on institutions, and the officers within them, throughout the medieval period. Papers will explore corruption, and entropy within institutions, how the beliefs and actions of officers shaped their institutions, and how institutions operated at various levels crossing all social strata and provinces of medieval Europe.