IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1514: New Approaches to the Third Crusade, I

Thursday 4 July 2019, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Medieval & Early Modern Centre, University of Sydney / Third Crusade Research Network
Organisers:James Henry Kane, Medieval & Early Modern Centre, University of Sydney
Stephen Spencer, Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Moderator/Chair:Joanna Phillips, School of Law, University of Leeds
Paper 1514-aRalph of Coggeshall's Account of the Third Crusade and Its Relationship with Richard de Templo's Itinerarium Peregrinorum et Gesta Regis Ricardi
(Language: English)
Stephen Spencer, Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Stephen Spencer, Institute of Historical Research, University of London
Index terms: Crusades, Language and Literature - Latin, Rhetoric
Paper 1514-bThe Representation of Latin Christian-Muslim Diplomacy in Roger of Howden's Accounts of the Third Crusade
(Language: English)
Katherine Mortimer, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London
Katherine Mortimer, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London
Index terms: Crusades, Mentalities, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1514-cHeroic Failure?: The Purpose of Battle Rhetoric in the Itinerarium Peregrinorum et Gesta Regis Ricardi
(Language: English)
Connor Wilson, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London
Connor Wilson, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London
Index terms: Crusades, Language and Literature - Latin, Rhetoric
Abstract

In recent decades, historians have devoted increasing attention to understanding the chronicles of the crusades not simply as sources of information, but as narratives and cultural artefacts. The sources for the First Crusade have featured prominently in this research, but there is ample scope for applying a similar focus to the wealth of contemporary texts documenting the events of the Third Crusade. The papers in this session offer valuable new insights into some of the key Latin accounts of the expedition by exploring the relationship between Ralph of Coggeshall’s Chronicon Anglicanum and Richard de Templo’s Itinerarium Peregrinorum, investigating Roger of Howden’s portrayal of diplomatic contacts between Christians and Muslims, and analysing the functions of battle rhetoric in the Itinerarium.