IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1517: Re-Enacting Jerusalem after the First Crusade: Jerusalem, Rome, Scandinavia

Thursday 4 July 2019, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:'Tracing the Jerusalem Code: Christian Cultures in Scandinavia', MF Norwegian School of Theology, Religion & Society, Research Council of Norway
Organiser:Eivor A. Oftestad, Det teologiske Menighetsfakultet, Oslo
Moderator/Chair:Ragnhild Marthine Bø, Institutt for arkeologi, konservering og historie, Universitetet i Oslo
Paper 1517-aRe-Enacting Christ's Resurrection Liturgically at the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem after the Conquest
(Language: English)
Nils Holger Petersen, Centre for the Study of the Cultural Heritage of Medieval Rituals, Københavns Universitet
Nils Holger Petersen, Centre for the Study of the Cultural Heritage of Medieval Rituals, Københavns Universitet
Index terms: Liturgy, Performance Arts - Drama
Paper 1517-bRe-Enacting the Temple: St John the Lateran and Translatio Templi after the Conquest of Jerusalem 1099
(Language: English)
Eivor A. Oftestad, Det teologiske Menighetsfakultet, Oslo
Eivor A. Oftestad, Det teologiske Menighetsfakultet, Oslo
Index terms: Crusades, Liturgy, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Theology
Paper 1517-cMaterializing Jerusalem in 12th-Century Scandinavia: Image, Altar, Liturgical Space
(Language: English)
Kristin B. Aavitsland, Det teologiske Menighetsfakultet, Oslo
Kristin B. Aavitsland, Det teologiske Menighetsfakultet, Oslo
Index terms: Art History - General, Liturgy
Abstract

The Frankish conquest of Jerusalem in 1099 influenced the representation and imagination of the holy city in Western Christianity. During the last decades scholars from a wide range of disciplines; church history, art history, crusader studies etc., have discussed the character of this influence. This session contributes to this field in three different case studies from Jerusalem, Rome, and Denmark. The papers investigate how the political possession of Jerusalem added new material dimensions to liturgical re-enactment and sacerdotal authority in the 12th century.