IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1523: Global Manuscripts: Materials, Materialities, Materialisms, I - (Un)Materialities

Thursday 4 July 2019, 09.00-10.30

Organisers:Catherine E. Karkov, School of Fine Art, History of Art & Cultural Studies, University of Leeds
Elaine Treharne, Department of English, Stanford University
Moderator/Chair:Elaine Treharne, Department of English, Stanford University
Paper 1523-aReading the (Un)Blank Parchment Page
(Language: English)
James D. Sargan, Old Books, New Science Lab (OBNS), University of Toronto
James D. Sargan, Old Books, New Science Lab (OBNS), University of Toronto
James D. Sargan, Old Books, New Science Lab (OBNS), University of Toronto
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1523-bFrom the Divine to the Digital: Digitisation as Resurrection and Reconstruction
(Language: English)
Keri Thomas, Independent Scholar, Aberystwyth
Keri Thomas, Independent Scholar, Aberystwyth
Keri Thomas, Independent Scholar, Aberystwyth
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1523-cWhat It Is to Be a Digitization Specialist: Chasing Medieval Material in a Sea of Pixels
(Language: English)
Astrid Johannah Smith, Digital Library Systems & Services, Stanford University Libraries
Astrid Johannah Smith, Digital Library Systems & Services, Stanford University Libraries
Astrid Johannah Smith, Digital Library Systems & Services, Stanford University Libraries
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Computing in Medieval Studies, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

These sessions aim to throw light on the production, consumption, and affordances of manuscripts from across the global Middle Ages during the period c.500-1500. Papers might deal with questions such as: What materials or processes were used in manuscript production? What ethical or political questions do these materials or processes raise? What do they have to tell us about medieval/modern understandings of matter itself? Why are certain manuscripts more highly valued than others? Why and how do some manuscripts have the power to shape our values and histories?