IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1527: Material Philology: Manuscripts as Physical Objects in the Ecdotic Practice, I - Scattered Antigraphs, Codicology, and Textual Transmission

Thursday 4 July 2019, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Società Internazionale per lo Studio del Medioevo Latino (SISMEL), Firenze
Organiser:Irene Malfatto, John Carter Brown Library, Rhode Island
Moderator/Chair:Irene Malfatto, John Carter Brown Library, Rhode Island
Paper 1527-a'Scheda est quod adhuc emendatur et necdum in libris redactum est': Material Philology and the Liber Glossarum Pre-History
(Language: English)
Marina Giani, Società Internazionale per lo Studio del Medioevo Latino, Firenze
Marina Giani, Società Internazionale per lo Studio del Medioevo Latino, Firenze
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Language and Literature - Latin, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1527-bImagining the Carmina Ratisponensia's Libellus: Traces of a Lost Poetry Manuscript in a 12th-Century Bavarian Miscellany
(Language: English)
Martina Pavoni, Società Internazionale per lo Studio del Medioevo Latino (SISMEL), Firenze
Martina Pavoni, Società Internazionale per lo Studio del Medioevo Latino (SISMEL), Firenze
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Women's Studies
Paper 1527-cManuscripts Recomposed: Case Studies in the Tradition of the Libellus de Ludo Schacorum of the Dominican Friar Iacobus de Cessolis
(Language: English)
Dario Personeni, Scuola Vaticana di Paleografia, Diplomatica e Archivistica, Roma
Dario Personeni, Scuola Vaticana di Paleografia, Diplomatica e Archivistica, Roma
Index terms: Language and Literature - Latin, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Sermons and Preaching
Abstract

The material accidents affecting manuscripts, which are frequently dismembered and recomposed in multiple ways, can have a substantial influence on the transmission of medieval texts. This session explores the manuscript tradition of selected works, in order to shed light on the material aspects of various transmission issues including the genesis of miscellaneous codices, the gathering of heterogeneous materials, or particularly complex and contaminated stemmas. Sometimes, the examination of manuscripts’ physical features allows us to formulate hypotheses concerning their origin and the strategies employed by their compilers, or to postulate antigraphs that do not take the usual ‘codex’ form. Such matters are of great interest to scholars working on philological investigations and transmission histories.