IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 153: Demons, Saints, and Nuns: New Work on Medieval Monasticism in England and Wales

Monday 1 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Sponsor:Journal of Medieval Monastic Studies, Brepols
Organisers:Janet Burton, School of Archaeology, History & Anthropology, University of Wales Trinity Saint David
Karen Stöber, Departament d'Història, Universitat de Lleida
Moderator/Chair:Janet Burton, School of Archaeology, History & Anthropology, University of Wales Trinity Saint David
Paper 153-aEncounters with Demons in the Carthusian Wilderness
(Language: English)
Kaan Vural Gorman, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Kaan Vural Gorman, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Kaan Vural Gorman, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Monasticism, Religious Life
Paper 153-bMaterial Girl: Defining Female Monasticism in Medieval Wales
(Language: English)
Amy Reynolds, School of History & Archaeology, University of Bangor
Amy Reynolds, School of History & Archaeology, University of Bangor
Amy Reynolds, School of History & Archaeology, University of Bangor
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Monasticism, Religious Life
Paper 153-cWriting Hagiography in the Welsh March: The Life of St Dyfrig and Gloucester Abbey
(Language: English)
Jennie England, Department of History, University of York
Jennie England, Department of History, University of York
Jennie England, Department of History, University of York
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Monasticism, Religious Life
Abstract

The three papers in this session represent new research on aspects of medieval monasticism by young scholars. Paper -a shall examine how accounts of Carthusian monks encountering demons in the wilderness of their charterhouses can reveal the different ways the monks understood their own purpose and identity; the second paper is an exploration of the extent of female monasticism in medieval Wales and the expectations of female monastics compared to their male counterparts; and the third paper will examine the 12th-century Life of St Dyfrig in the context of Gloucester Abbey, shedding light on what this text can reveal about the community’s identity and ambitions.