IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1537: Fashioning Imperial Authority: The Materialities of Power and the Constantinian Dynasty, 306-363

Thursday 4 July 2019, 09.00-10.30

Sponsor:Centre for Late Antique Religion & Culture, Cardiff University
Organiser:Nicholas Baker-Brian, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Moderator/Chair:Shaun Tougher, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Paper 1537-aSpitting Image: Imperial Portraits in the Constantinian Empire
(Language: English)
Nicholas Baker-Brian, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Nicholas Baker-Brian, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Nicholas Baker-Brian, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Index terms: Administration, Archaeology - General, Historiography - Medieval, Rhetoric
Paper 1537-bLegal Materialities: Julian, Constantine, and the Restoration of Ecclesiastical Property
(Language: English)
Nicola Ernst, School of Historical & Philosophical Inquiry, University of Queensland
Nicola Ernst, School of Historical & Philosophical Inquiry, University of Queensland
Nicola Ernst, School of Historical & Philosophical Inquiry, University of Queensland
Index terms: Administration, Byzantine Studies, Law, Religious Life
Paper 1537-cUndressing the Emperors: Costume, Coins, and Continuity
(Language: English)
William Lewis, Department of Ancient History, Cardiff University
William Lewis, Department of Ancient History, Cardiff University
William Lewis, Department of Ancient History, Cardiff University
Index terms: Administration, Archaeology - General, Byzantine Studies, Numismatics
Abstract

This session analyses the materialities of power in relation to the promotion of the Constantinian dynasty, 306-363. The Constantinian emperors utilised a range of objects to fashion both a language and a narrative of legitimacy that facilitated the transmission of the dynasty’s identity from imperial centre to provincial periphery. This session discusses the materialities of the dynasty, focusing on coins, imperial portraits, and legal constitutions. While these aspects of late Roman dynastic identity are not unique, the ‘Constantinian turn’ marked a change of direction in the role that objects played in the period’s seismic political, religious, and legal transformations.