IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1602: Rematerializing Old English after 1500, I: Old English Translation in Theory and Practice

Thursday 4 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Organisers:Rachel Fletcher, School of Critical Studies, University of Glasgow
Thijs Porck, Centre for the Arts in Society, Universiteit Leiden
Moderator/Chair:Thijs Porck, Centre for the Arts in Society, Universiteit Leiden
Paper 1602-aEarly Modern Translations of Old English
(Language: English)
Tristan Major, Department of English Literature & Linguistics, Qatar University
Tristan Major, Department of English Literature & Linguistics, Qatar University
Tristan Major, Department of English Literature & Linguistics, Qatar University
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Medievalism and Antiquarianism
Paper 1602-bLexicography and New Old English: Dictionaries as Translation Tools
(Language: English)
Rachel Fletcher, School of Critical Studies, University of Glasgow
Rachel Fletcher, School of Critical Studies, University of Glasgow
Rachel Fletcher, School of Critical Studies, University of Glasgow
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Medievalism and Antiquarianism
Paper 1602-cThick Translation of the Old English Riddle
(Language: English)
Judy Kendall, School of Arts & Media, University of Salford
Judy Kendall, School of Arts & Media, University of Salford
Judy Kendall, School of Arts & Media, University of Salford
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Medievalism and Antiquarianism
Abstract

This session is the first of two sessions that focus on the way writers and scholars after 1500 ‘rematerialized’ the language and literature of the Anglo-Saxon period. The papers in this session concentrate on the choices, theories and practicalities involved in translation. Paper-a reviews Latin and English translations by Early Modern scholars from Matthew Parker to David Wilkins. Paper-b considers the role and influence of lexicography on Old English translation. Paper-c considers translations and adaptations of Old English riddles through the lens of translation theory.