IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1607: Memory, Community, and Identity in High Medieval Northumbria, II

Thursday 4 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Organiser:Dan Talbot, School of History, University of East Anglia
Moderator/Chair:Helen Birkett, Department of History, University of Exeter
Paper 1607-a1138 Revisited: Nation, Nature, and Memory in Aelred of Rievaulx's Battle of the Standard
(Language: English)
Jesse Harrington, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
Jesse Harrington, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
Jesse Harrington, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Latin, Political Thought, Sermons and Preaching
Paper 1607-bThe Contested Identity of St Oswine of Tynemouth
(Language: English)
Christiania Whitehead, Faculté des lettres, Université de Lausanne
Christiania Whitehead, Faculté des lettres, Université de Lausanne
Christiania Whitehead, Faculté des lettres, Université de Lausanne
Index terms: Ecclesiastical History, Hagiography, Historiography - Medieval
Paper 1607-cRemembering the Conqueror: Perspectives on William I from the 12th-Century North-East
(Language: English)
Dan Talbot, School of History, University of East Anglia
Dan Talbot, School of History, University of East Anglia
Dan Talbot, School of History, University of East Anglia
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Local History, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

This pair of sessions explores the negotiation of community identity in the northeast of England in the 11-12th centuries and beyond, through the prisms of medieval historiography, hagiography, and homiletic. Different communities in Durham, Yorkshire, and Northumberland all sought to place their own stamp on the memory of the distant and more immediate Northumbrian past, and to argue for what it meant for regional and indeed ‘national’ identity in the politically and culturally changing present. The papers in this session consider those contested identities through a range of cases. Session I focuses on community memory within the single community of Durham, while Session II expands to explore the political memory and identity of the northeast more broadly.