IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1631: The Plantagenets: Sibling Affection, Rivalry, and Dynastic Self-Interest in the Later Middle Ages

Thursday 4 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Organiser:Adrian Jobson, School of Humanities, Canterbury Christ Church University
Moderator/Chair:Louise J. Wilkinson, School of Humanities, Canterbury Christ Church University
Paper 1631-aA Mother's Role: Eleanor of Aquitaine and the Rebellions of 1173 and 1183
(Language: English)
Gabrielle Storey, Department of History, University of Winchester
Gabrielle Storey, Department of History, University of Winchester
Index terms: Gender Studies, Genealogy and Prosopography, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1631-b'You sure can't choose your family, and they're still kin whether you acknowledge them or not': Richard of Cornwall, Illegitimacy, and the Forging of a Familial Network
(Language: English)
Adrian Jobson, School of Humanities, Canterbury Christ Church University
Adrian Jobson, School of Humanities, Canterbury Christ Church University
Index terms: Genealogy and Prosopography, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1631-cSisters of Mercy?: Edward II and His Siblings
(Language: English)
Paul R. Dryburgh, The National Archives, Kew
Paul R. Dryburgh, The National Archives, Kew
Index terms: Gender Studies, Genealogy and Prosopography, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

This session aims to explore the nature of sibling relationships within the Plantagenet dynasty in the Later Middle Ages and their concomitant political ramifications. Gabrielle Storey’s paper will offer a re-evaluation of Eleanor of Aquitaine’s role in her sons’ rebellions against their father, Henry II, and demonstrates how contemporary concepts of royal motherhood and queenship can reveal new insights on sibling rivalries within the dynasty in the late 12th century. Adrian Jobson will then consider the relationship between the Plantagenets and their illegitimate kin through a case study of Richard of Cornwall, whose advancement of his agnatic siblings and their own families helped sustain his dominant position in English politics. Finally, Paul Dryburgh will explore Edward II’s relationship with his three surviving elder sisters in the years after his coronation and illustrates how their sisterly affection for him provided both comfort and political support amidst the upheavals of his reign.