IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1644: Fictive Materialities in Late Medieval Italian Art

Thursday 4 July 2019, 11.15-12.45

Organiser:Laura Jacobus, Department of History of Art & Screen Media, Birkbeck, University of London
Moderator/Chair:Louise Bourdua, Department of the History of Art, University of Warwick
Paper 1644-aThe Sheen of Gold and Precious Stones: Giotto's Experimentation in Padua
(Language: English)
Giacomo Guazzini, Kunsthistorisches Institut, Max-Planck-Institut, Firenze
Giacomo Guazzini, Kunsthistorisches Institut, Max-Planck-Institut, Firenze
Giacomo Guazzini, Kunsthistorisches Institut, Max-Planck-Institut, Firenze
Index terms: Art History - Decorative Arts, Art History - Painting
Paper 1644-bFictive Materiality and Real Presence in Giotto's Arena Chapel
(Language: English)
Laura Jacobus, Department of History of Art & Screen Media, Birkbeck, University of London
Laura Jacobus, Department of History of Art & Screen Media, Birkbeck, University of London
Laura Jacobus, Department of History of Art & Screen Media, Birkbeck, University of London
Index terms: Art History - General, Art History - Painting
Paper 1644-cPlasticity, Inertia, and Iconography: Depicting Marble Statues in Italian Painting, c. 1400
(Language: English)
Péter Bokody, School of Humanities & Performing Arts, Plymouth University
Péter Bokody, School of Humanities & Performing Arts, Plymouth University
Péter Bokody, School of Humanities & Performing Arts, Plymouth University
Index terms: Art History - General, Art History - Painting
Abstract

The revolution in Late Medieval Italian art which crystallized around the figure of Giotto is commonly understood to have been mimetic, naturalistic and illusionistic in its intentions. Artists are said to have been engaged in the project of reproducing the visual experience of reality. This session draws attention to a particular phenomenon: that painters often attempted to mimic different materials in the medium of paint. It asks whether these abundant instances of fictive materiality were merely expressions of a general interest in pictorial mimesis, or whether they served other purposes- and if so, what might those purposes have been?