IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1713: Religious Dissent, Reform, and Repression, III: Notaries and Records in the Inquisitorial Procedure

Thursday 4 July 2019, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Department for the Study of Religions, Masarykova univerzita, Brno
Organiser:David Zbíral, Department for the Study of Religions, Masarykova univerzita, Brno
Moderator/Chair:Gregory Lippiatt, Centre d'Études Supérieures de Civilisation Médiévale (CESCM), Université de Poitiers
Paper 1713-aWorking, Writing, and Dying for the Inquisition: Officium Fidei's Notaries in Italy, 13th-14th Centuries
(Language: English)
Luca Fois, Independent Scholar, Robbiate
Luca Fois, Independent Scholar, Robbiate
Index terms: Administration, Canon Law, Ecclesiastical History, Law
Paper 1713-bMen of the Law, Men of Arms: The Many Faces of the Inquisition Notary in Medieval Italy
(Language: English)
Jill Moore, Department of History, Classics & Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London
Jill Moore, Department of History, Classics & Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London
Index terms: Administration, Canon Law, Ecclesiastical History, Law
Paper 1713-cTextual Techniques and the Construction of Knowledge in Friar Ferrier's Inquisition Records
(Language: English)
Saku Pihko, Trivium - Tampere Centre for Classical, Medieval & Early Modern Studies, University of Tampere
Saku Pihko, Trivium - Tampere Centre for Classical, Medieval & Early Modern Studies, University of Tampere
Index terms: Anthropology, Ecclesiastical History, Literacy and Orality, Social History
Abstract

This session explores the often underestimated role of notaries and notarial records in the investigation of heresy in the first century of the papal inquisition. The papers argue that notaries and their practices of writing shaped inquisitorial documents in important and distinctive ways. Notaries were often far more than ‘inquisitors’ assistants’. They exercised considerable influence on the procedures used by medieval inquisitors (who were more often theologians than lawyers by formation and had to learn the basics of the trial procedure relatively late in their careers) and had considerable influence on their documents and their shaping of the reality of heresy.