IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1721: New Approaches to Medieval Anglo-Jewry, III: Remembering the Jews of Medieval England

Thursday 4 July 2019, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Jewish Historical Society of England
Organiser:Dean A. Irwin, School of Humanities, Canterbury Christ Church University
Moderator/Chair:Louise J. Wilkinson, School of Humanities, Canterbury Christ Church University
Paper 1721-aChanging Fortunes: Revisiting Money, Power, and the Jews of Medieval London
(Language: English)
Anthony Bale, Department of English & Humanities, Birkbeck, University of London
Anthony Bale, Department of English & Humanities, Birkbeck, University of London
Anthony Bale, Department of English & Humanities, Birkbeck, University of London
Index terms: Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Historiography - Medieval
Paper 1721-bBristol's Medieval Jews and 33 Jacobs Well Road: 'The Jewish equivalent to Tutankhamen's tomb' or Simply an Abandoned Bet Tohorah?
(Language: English)
Toni Griffiths, Department of Theology, Religion & Philosophy, University of Winchester
Toni Griffiths, Department of Theology, Religion & Philosophy, University of Winchester
Toni Griffiths, Department of Theology, Religion & Philosophy, University of Winchester
Index terms: Archaeology - Sites, Hebrew and Jewish Studies
Paper 1721-cContextualising the Medieval Anglo-Jewish Community: Making the Case for the Potential of a Multi-Disciplinary Approach to Further Understanding on Social Inclusion and Integration in the Urban Space
(Language: English)
Esther Robinson Wild, Independent Scholar, Whitchurch-on-Thames
Esther Robinson Wild, Independent Scholar, Whitchurch-on-Thames
Esther Robinson Wild, Independent Scholar, Whitchurch-on-Thames
Index terms: Archaeology - Sites, Hebrew and Jewish Studies
Abstract

The past decade has seen a growth in interest in medieval Anglo-Jewish studies. That has seen a number of mainstream medievalists touch on the topic as part of isolated publications, as well as a growing number of scholars specialising in the area. That new generation of scholarship has been less reliant on printed calendars of documents and has, instead, been more adventurous in their use of sources. This panel will seek to explore the ways in which the Jews of medieval have been remembered in the centuries since the Expulsion of the Jews from England (1290), and how they continue to be perceived.