IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1726: Materiality in Series, III: Serial Analysis and Materiality

Thursday 4 July 2019, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:'Scripta-PSL': Histoire et pratiques de l’écrit, Université Paris Sciences & Lettres / Sonderforschungsbereich 933 'Materiale Textkulturen', Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Organiser:Jean-Baptiste Camps, Université Paris IV - Sorbonne
Moderator/Chair:Peter A. Stokes, Department of Digital Humanities, King's College London
Paper 1726-aCan We Explore the Materiality of Charters Using Digital Methods?
(Language: English)
Nicolas Perreaux, Sonderforschungsbereich 1095 'Schwächediskurse und Ressourcenregime', Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main / Laboratoire de médiévistique occidentale de Paris (LaMOP), Université de la Sorbonne, Paris
Nicolas Perreaux, Sonderforschungsbereich 1095 'Schwächediskurse und Ressourcenregime', Goethe-Universität, Frankfurt am Main / Laboratoire de médiévistique occidentale de Paris (LaMOP), Université de la Sorbonne, Paris
Index terms: Charters and Diplomatics, Computing in Medieval Studies
Paper 1726-bSerial Analysis of Manuscript Features: Placing Epic Manuscripts inside French Vernacular Production
(Language: English)
Jean-Baptiste Camps, Université Paris IV - Sorbonne
Jean-Baptiste Camps, Université Paris IV - Sorbonne
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Language and Literature - French or Occitan, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 1726-cSerial Analysis: The Materiality and Texts of Relic Labels
(Language: English)
Kirsten Wallenwein, Lateinische Philologie des Mittelalters und der Neuzeit, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Kirsten Wallenwein, Lateinische Philologie des Mittelalters und der Neuzeit, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Language and Literature - Latin, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

The digital humanities have given a new impetus to serial or quantitative approaches to medieval manuscript production. Following the development of quantitative history in the 1950s and 1960s and, more precisely, of quantitative codicology, the field saw the production of numerous important early works. The wider availability of digital data, be it manuscript descriptions, facsimilia or transcriptions, now allows for the constitution of larger corpora and the serial analysis of their features. Through digital and statistical approaches, this session will explore the materiality of objects pertaining to the medieval written production, charters and documents as well as manuscripts.