IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1735: Voices of Law, III: Materialising Legal Language and Treaties

Thursday 4 July 2019, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Voices of Law: Language, Text & Practice
Organiser:Matthew McHaffie, Department of History, King's College London
Moderator/Chair:Helle Vogt, Center for Retskulturelle Studier, Det Juridiske Fakultet, Københavns Universitet
Paper 1735-aMedieval Interest in Law: Old and Middle English Glosses and Glossaries
(Language: English)
Sara María Pons-Sanz, Centre for Language & Communication Research, Cardiff University
Sara María Pons-Sanz, Centre for Language & Communication Research, Cardiff University
Sara María Pons-Sanz, Centre for Language & Communication Research, Cardiff University
Index terms: Language and Literature - Old English, Language and Literature - Middle English, Law
Paper 1735-b'When the horn sounds': Urban Legal Terminology in Non-Urban Norway
(Language: English)
Miriam Tveit, Fakultetet for Samfunnsvitenskap, Nord universitet
Miriam Tveit, Fakultetet for Samfunnsvitenskap, Nord universitet
Miriam Tveit, Fakultetet for Samfunnsvitenskap, Nord universitet
Index terms: Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Law
Paper 1735-cTreaties and the Materiality of Conflict Resolution
(Language: English)
Jenny Benham, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Jenny Benham, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Jenny Benham, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Index terms: Law, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

Legal texts and terminology are the theme of this session. Pons-Sanz explores Old and Middle English medieval glosses and glossaries with a legal focus in order to throw light on their compilers’ and users’ interest in past and contemporary legal systems from the British Isles and abroad. Tveit asks how urban law was given expression in a less urbanised society? By studying the legal ‘urban’ terminology of the Norwegian Town Law (1276), she investigates whether it can be identified as the construction of an urban law within a distinctly rural legal culture. Benham discusses the materiality of treaties over the period 700-1200 as a corpus of legal texts, examining them as physical objects; she highlights the material culture of the texts, and the ‘legal’ elements of conflict resolution more generally.