IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 1744: Precious Pastimes: Music and Entertainments for Regular and Secular Nobility

Thursday 4 July 2019, 14.15-15.45

Organiser:Maria Portmann, Kunsthistorisches Institut, Universität Zürich
Moderator/Chair:Michael A. Conrad, Kunsthistorisches Institut, Universität Zürich
Paper 1744-aThe Interaction between Metallic and Painted Elements in the Decoration of the Camera Domini of Chillon Castle (Switzerland)
(Language: English)
Pierre-Yves Theler, Château de Chillon, Veytaux / Swiss Design Center, école d’architecture, d’intérieur & design, Lausanne
Pierre-Yves Theler, Château de Chillon, Veytaux / Swiss Design Center, école d’architecture, d’intérieur & design, Lausanne
Index terms: Architecture - Secular, Art History - Decorative Arts, Art History - Painting
Paper 1744-bNoble Materials for Noble Pastimes: Medieval Game Pieces as a Matter of Royal Representation in Europe in the 12th and 13th Centuries - A Transcultural Perspective
(Language: English)
Michael A. Conrad, Kunsthistorisches Institut, Universität Zürich
Michael A. Conrad, Kunsthistorisches Institut, Universität Zürich
Index terms: Art History - Decorative Arts, Art History - Painting, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Social History
Paper 1744-cPrecious Materials for Music Instruments as Distinctive Signs of Power: The Organ of the Valeria Church in Sion (Switzerland)
(Language: English)
Maria Portmann, Kunsthistorisches Institut, Universität Zürich
Maria Portmann, Kunsthistorisches Institut, Universität Zürich
Index terms: Art History - General, Liturgy, Manuscripts and Palaeography, Music
Abstract

During the Middle Ages, carving wood, creating metal and painted decorations were made by workers of a lower social status for regular and secular nobility. Some sources explaining either their methodology or the acquisition of objects made with noble materials, like precious wood or metal. Such objects were made either to be played or to be shown as objects of power in private and public spaces which were used to show their religious or political power. In this session, we will focus on the technique to realize games, organs and ornaments, on their use as distinctive signs of the power and of the identity of their owner. Finally, we will show how they were used in spaces as part of the day-life and of rituals. Our topics will focus on the reception and on the use of materials by the nobility in Europe during the Middle Ages.