IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 216: Network Analysis for Medieval Studies, II: Episcopal Networks

Monday 1 July 2019, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Social Network Analysis Researchers of the Middle Ages (SNARMA)
Organiser:Matthew H. Hammond, Department of History, King's College London
Moderator/Chair:Julian P. Haseldine, Department of History, University of Hull
Paper 216-aThe Networks of Bishop Gilbert Foliot of London and Master David of London
(Language: English)
Catherine Healy, School of History, University of East Anglia
Catherine Healy, School of History, University of East Anglia
Catherine Healy, School of History, University of East Anglia
Index terms: Administration, Computing in Medieval Studies, Ecclesiastical History, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 216-bNetworks in the Gregorian Era: The 'Register' of Bishop Lambert of Arras
(Language: English)
Nicolas Ruffini-Ronzani, Département d'Histoire, Université de Namur
Nicolas Ruffini-Ronzani, Département d'Histoire, Université de Namur
Nicolas Ruffini-Ronzani, Département d'Histoire, Université de Namur
Index terms: Administration, Computing in Medieval Studies, Ecclesiastical History, Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 216-cClerics as Messengers and Envoys in the Networks of Frederick II
(Language: English)
Benjamin Torn, Lehrstuhl für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
Benjamin Torn, Lehrstuhl für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
Benjamin Torn, Lehrstuhl für Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
Index terms: Administration, Computing in Medieval Studies, Genealogy and Prosopography, Politics and Diplomacy
Abstract

The techniques and the conceptual framework of network analysis have recently found their way into historical scholarship. Several important endeavours, such as the establishment of the ‘Journal of Historical Network Research’, testify to the growing interest of historians in network analysis and more generally in structured relational data. This panel, part of a series recurring annually at the IMC, aims at gathering some of the otherwise rather dispersed papers building on network analysis, applying this methodology to medieval material, bringing palpable results of interest to scholars from the respective fields of expertise, and promoting comparison and debate. This year’s sessions pay special attention to processes of governance accessed through networks extracted from diplomatic sources, to networks involving bishops and other churchmen in various capacities, and to medieval learning and intertextuality accessed through networks of manuscripts, authors, references, concepts, and motifs.