IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 241: The Literary Heritage of Anglo-Dutch Relations, c. 1050 - c. 1600: Material Textualities

Monday 1 July 2019, 14.15-15.45

Sponsor:Leverhulme Trust / Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Bristol
Organiser:Ad Putter, Department of English, University of Bristol
Moderator/Chair:Elizabeth M. Tyler, Department of English & Related Literature, University of York
Paper 241-aBuried Abroad in the 1080s: The Materiality of Two Anglo-Flemish Latin Obituaries for Women Inscribed on Stone and Metal
(Language: English)
Elisabeth van Houts, Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge
Elisabeth van Houts, Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge
Elisabeth van Houts, Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge
Index terms: Daily Life, Mentalities, Social History, Women's Studies
Paper 241-bBordering the North Sea: The Margins of Anglo-Dutch Histories in Manuscript and Print
(Language: English)
Sjoerd Levelt, Program in Cultures, Civilizations & Ideas, Bilkent University, Ankara
Sjoerd Levelt, Program in Cultures, Civilizations & Ideas, Bilkent University, Ankara
Sjoerd Levelt, Program in Cultures, Civilizations & Ideas, Bilkent University, Ankara
Index terms: Historiography - Medieval, Language and Literature - Dutch, Mentalities, Social History
Paper 241-cThe Mercers in Flanders and England: The Literature of Anglo-Dutch Bilingualism
(Language: English)
Ad Putter, Department of English, University of Bristol
Ad Putter, Department of English, University of Bristol
Ad Putter, Department of English, University of Bristol
Index terms: Language and Literature - Dutch, Language and Literature - Middle English, Mentalities, Social History
Abstract

Historical relations between England and the Low Countries had a profound cultural impact on both sides of the North Sea, and the tangible textual remains of these relations provide fascinating insights into both medieval literature and social history. The papers in this session explore these insights by focusing on material textualities in a range of media:
1) obituary inscriptions on stone and metal of Flemish migrants; 2) annotations by early readers in the margins of medieval Anglo-Dutch chronicles and early prints; and 3) a quadrilingual mercantile manuscript (in Latin, French, Dutch, English).