IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 316: Network Analysis for Medieval Studies, III: Networked Texts

Monday 1 July 2019, 16.30-18.00

Sponsor:Department for the Study of Religions, Masarykova univerzita, Brno
Organiser:David Zbíral, Department for the Study of Religions, Masarykova univerzita, Brno
Moderator/Chair:Matthew H. Hammond, Department of History, King's College London
Paper 316-aHistorian versus Machine: Testing the Validity of Automated Network Extraction from Inquisitorial Records
(Language: English)
David Zbíral, Department for the Study of Religions, Masarykova univerzita, Brno
David Zbíral, Department for the Study of Religions, Masarykova univerzita, Brno
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Computing in Medieval Studies, Religious Life, Social History
Paper 316-bNetworks of Alchemical Symbols: Selected Early Prints from Bohemia
(Language: English)
Zdenko Vozár, Department for the Study of Religions, Masarykova univerzita, Brno
Zdenko Vozár, Department for the Study of Religions, Masarykova univerzita, Brno
Index terms: Archives and Sources, Computing in Medieval Studies, Science, Technology
Paper 316-cEstablishing Scribal Networks from Stemmas: The Case of Njáls Saga
(Language: English)
Alaric Hall, Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki
Alaric Hall, Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki
Index terms: Computing in Medieval Studies, Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Manuscripts and Palaeography
Abstract

The techniques and the conceptual framework of network analysis have recently found their way into historical scholarship. Several important endeavours, such as the establishment of the ‘Journal of Historical Network Research’, testify to the growing interest of historians in network analysis and more generally in structured relational data. This panel, part of a series recurring annually at the IMC, aims at gathering some of the otherwise rather dispersed papers building on network analysis, applying this methodology to medieval material, bringing palpable results of interest to scholars from the respective fields of expertise, and promoting comparison and debate. This year’s sessions pay special attention to processes of governance accessed through networks extracted from diplomatic sources, to networks involving bishops and other churchmen in various capacities, and to medieval learning and intertextuality accessed through networks of manuscripts, authors, references, concepts, and motifs.