IMC 2019: Sessions

Session 328: Inscribed In: Epigraphy and Materiality in Medieval Scandinavia

Monday 1 July 2019, 16.30-18.00

Organiser:Karen Langsholt Holmqvist, Institutt for lingvistiske og nordiske studier, Universitetet i Oslo / Norsk institutt for kulturminneforskning, Oslo
Moderator/Chair:Stefka G. Eriksen, Norsk institutt for kulturminneforskning, Oslo
Paper 328-aMaterial Directing Form?: The Design of Public Inscriptions on Stone, Metal, and Wood
(Language: English)
Johan Bollaert, Institutt for lingvistiske og nordiske studier, Universitetet i Oslo
Johan Bollaert, Institutt for lingvistiske og nordiske studier, Universitetet i Oslo
Johan Bollaert, Institutt for lingvistiske og nordiske studier, Universitetet i Oslo
Index terms: Epigraphy, Language and Literature - Scandinavian, Literacy and Orality
Paper 328-bMetal Texts: A Discussion on Metal as Medium for Writing and the Implications It Has for Textual Content and Choice of Script
(Language: English)
Elise Kleivane, Institutt for lingvistiske og nordiske studier, Universitetet i Oslo
Elise Kleivane, Institutt for lingvistiske og nordiske studier, Universitetet i Oslo
Elise Kleivane, Institutt for lingvistiske og nordiske studier, Universitetet i Oslo
Index terms: Epigraphy, Language and Literature - Scandinavian
Paper 328-cExpressions Conditioned by Materiality: Graffiti and Formal Inscriptions on Churches in Wood and Stone
(Language: English)
Karen Langsholt Holmqvist, Institutt for lingvistiske og nordiske studier, Universitetet i Oslo / Norsk institutt for kulturminneforskning, Oslo
Karen Langsholt Holmqvist, Institutt for lingvistiske og nordiske studier, Universitetet i Oslo / Norsk institutt for kulturminneforskning, Oslo
Karen Langsholt Holmqvist, Institutt for lingvistiske og nordiske studier, Universitetet i Oslo / Norsk institutt for kulturminneforskning, Oslo
Index terms: Epigraphy, Language and Literature - Scandinavian
Abstract

Epigraphy is inseparable from its material context. It is inscribed in stone, wood, lead, or bone. The text is adapted to the object and the material influences both the production and reception of the inscriptions. We discuss private and public inscriptions on churches, gravestones, and metal objects, thereby bringing together material and text, as well as runes and Roman alphabetic script. We address the following questions: How does the material influence the form, content and interpretation of inscriptions? Does it affect the relation between carvers and readers, or the public and private sphere? Does the material determine the choice between runes and Roman alphabet?